¿Quién eres? ¿Qué haces?

Have you ever wanted to just get away? That’s been how many are feeling here recently, so we have been participating in a little escapism and role play to study some famous Spanish-speaking people.

Rita Moreno

Rita Moreno

Gabriel García Márquez

Gabriel García Márquez

This week in Spanish, seventh graders have been assuming the identities of famous Spanish- speakers from all over the world and done investigations into some film directors, fashion designers, novelists, and artists who speak Spanish. A few names of people who we investigated were Gabriel García Márquez, Rita Moreno, Carolina Herrera, and Guillermo del Toro. After randomly drawing a character from an envelope, students looked into their famous person’s past, importance, job, and home country. Then, they moved on to interview everyone else in the class who also took on the roles of famous Spanish-speakers so everyone could learn more about each famous person. At the end of that, students chose which famous people were of greatest interest to them and created profiles for three different people that were featured on our list of famous people.

Carolina Herrera

Guillermo del Toro

Guillermo del Toro

In these profiles, students not only talked about and described each individual, but they also had to write a brief description about why each person was important, not only to his or her Spanish-speaking community, but also to the individual students. After this research was over, students shared what they found out with each other in small groups.

 

This activity has helped students build some important language skills like asking questions, using the verb ser (to be), and learning vocabulary related to jobs and professions. As students interviewed each other pretending to be famous Spanish-speakers, they communicated only in Spanish; once again filling our classroom with the music of their voices in Spanish. Great work to all of them!

Profe

 

¡Verbos!

 

Hola ¿Cómo está usted?

Hola ¿Cómo está usted?

It’s been a busy year so far in 6th grade Spanish! We started by learning how to appropriately greet different people in Spanish, from our friends and family, to the King and Queen of Spain.

Hola ¿Cómo estás?

Hola ¿Cómo estás?

After learning how to greet people, we worked on learning subject pronouns. In English, these are I, you, he/she/it, etc. In Spanish, they are: yo, tú, él, ella, usted, nosotros, vosotros, ellos, ellas, ustedes.

After learning how to address people, we moved on to how to conjugate verbs. When we conjugate verbs, we change them so that they reflect the subject we are talking about. We start conjugating by looking at infinitive verbs, which in English have the word “to” at the beginning, for example, to run, to speak, to jump, to sing. When conjugating a verb in English for any subject other than he, she, or it, we simply remove the “to” at the beginning: I run. For he, she, and it, we get rid of the “to” and add an “s” to the end of the word: she runs.

In Spanish, infinitive verbs either end with -ar, -er, or -ir. Right now, we are focusing on just the verbs that end in -ar, for example: hablar(to speak), dibujar (to draw), pintar (to paint). To conjugate an -ar verb, we start by taking off the -ar at the end of the verb, for example hablar becomes habl. We then add different endings to that verb depending on the subject of the verb. See below for how to conjugate hablar.

To practice our conjugations, 6th graders have been writing mini-stories and scripts as well as making profiles for different people with verbs that people do. Next week, they will be working together with a partner to create scripts in which they will showcase everything they have learned so far about how to greet people and how to use verbs. Gracias to all of them for their hard work!

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